Key Peninsula

The Key Peninsula – so-named because it's roughly shaped like a key – is a narrow stretch of land between Carr Inlet and Case Inlet at the southern edge of Puget Sound. Made up of several small communities, including Wauna, Minter, Glen Cove, Vaughn, Key Center, Longbranch, and Lakebay, the Key Peninsula is an area that values simple living; one of its towns is literally named Home.

Like its nearby cousin Gig Harbor, the Key Peninsula is insulated with forests and surrounded by gorgeous views of the water. The eastern edge of the peninsula looks over Carr Inlet to Mt. Rainier, while those living on the western side look over Case Inlet to the Olympic Mountains. Homes are often found down private drives, but there are also several lake and beach-front communities where neighbors are nearby. Elementary schools and the middle school are located right on the peninsula, while the high school is just on the far side of the Purdy Spit, which aids in easy transitions for children growing up.

Because of its State Parks, public boat launches, and close proximity to Tacoma, the Key Peninsula is becoming a popular place to camp and boat. The Civic Center with its history museum, the busy pub and marina in Lakebay, and the shops in Key Center lend color and culture to the area.

 Sandy beaches skirt the Peninsula on low-tide days, accessible on public beach fronts, and at State Parks, such as Penrose and Joemma.

Sandy beaches skirt the Peninsula on low-tide days, accessible on public beach fronts, and at State Parks, such as Penrose and Joemma.

 Along with waterfront homes, the Key Peninsula is populated by lake communities, modest modular homes, and houses on large acreage where people pasture horses, and raise small numbers of livestock.

Along with waterfront homes, the Key Peninsula is populated by lake communities, modest modular homes, and houses on large acreage where people pasture horses, and raise small numbers of livestock.




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